Month: May 2014

Throwback Thursday: Queen Latifah

I wanted to post this on Tuesday, but then it wouldn’t be a #TBT, so to speak. On may way into the city, and on my way out, I have this chill song on repeat. Just Another Day is one of those songs that lets you know that you take the good with the bad in the everyday hustle, but in the end, life really isn’t all that bad. 

Throwback Thursday: Queen Latifah

I wanted to post this on Tuesday, but then it wouldn’t be a #TBT, so to speak. On may way into the city, and on my way out, I have this chill song on repeat. Just Another Day is one of those songs that lets you know that you take the good with the bad in the everyday hustle, but in the end, life really isn’t all that bad. 

The Quiet Ones: NYC’s First Lady Chirlane McCray

“Some people are just quiet—they don’t need to be talking all the time and aren’t extroverted, but they’re not necessarily afraid to talk…”

The New York Magazine article focusing on Ms. McCray really resonated with me, as I consider myself to be one of the quiet, yet strong, intellectual and experienced voices in this Twitter and Instagram era. There is something to be said about the one who is the least flashy, who makes the most impact. At times I have questioned my own career moves, as I look across the pond at other, more successful bloggers who aren’t afraid to get in front of the camera and make themselves the celebrity. That was never my thing; I was always about reporting on what I saw and doing my job very well. This mantra seems the same for Ms. McCray.  

Chirlane has quietly made herself an unlikely star and the voice of the quiet one, and I admire that. As a hallmark of her missions, she even pushes back against the popular corporate climbing theme of the Lean In movement, and instead promotes the foundation of what she believes lies at the heart of feminism: women helping women with the most basic of needs.  It’s not the hyperbolic stance of a Sandbergian manifesto. But rest assured, her voice is loud and clear.
Read the article in New York Magazine.

The Quiet Ones: NYC’s First Lady Chirlane McCray

“Some people are just quiet—they don’t need to be talking all the time and aren’t extroverted, but they’re not necessarily afraid to talk…”

The New York Magazine article focusing on Ms. McCray really resonated with me, as I consider myself to be one of the quiet, yet strong, intellectual and experienced voices in this Twitter and Instagram era. There is something to be said about the one who is the least flashy, who makes the most impact. At times I have questioned my own career moves, as I look across the pond at other, more successful bloggers who aren’t afraid to get in front of the camera and make themselves the celebrity. That was never my thing; I was always about reporting on what I saw and doing my job very well. This mantra seems the same for Ms. McCray.  

Chirlane has quietly made herself an unlikely star and the voice of the quiet one, and I admire that. As a hallmark of her missions, she even pushes back against the popular corporate climbing theme of the Lean In movement, and instead promotes the foundation of what she believes lies at the heart of feminism: women helping women with the most basic of needs.  It’s not the hyperbolic stance of a Sandbergian manifesto. But rest assured, her voice is loud and clear.
Read the article in New York Magazine.

Cannes Film Festival 2014: The Red Carpet

Best in Show: Freida Pinto
The south of France is one of my favorite places to visit. It’s wonderfully tranquil, laid back and sophisticated – the perfect getaway.  The trip is easily accessed via train from Italy, and the views of the Mediterranean are spectacular. But this isn’t a post about my travels. It’s about the star-filled Festival de Cannes, the annual celebration of the future films to be seen. Here are some of my favorite looks from the red carpet:
 America Ferrera
Liya Kibede
Lupita Nyong’o
Aishwarya Rai
 Salma Hayek
Sonam Kapoor
There’s more fabulous-ness over on Facebook.

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Cannes Film Festival 2014: The Red Carpet

Best in Show: Freida Pinto
The south of France is one of my favorite places to visit. It’s wonderfully tranquil, laid back and sophisticated – the perfect getaway.  The trip is easily accessed via train from Italy, and the views of the Mediterranean are spectacular. But this isn’t a post about my travels. It’s about the star-filled Festival de Cannes, the annual celebration of the future films to be seen. Here are some of my favorite looks from the red carpet:
 America Ferrera
Liya Kibede
Lupita Nyong’o
Aishwarya Rai
 Salma Hayek
Sonam Kapoor
There’s more fabulous-ness over on Facebook.

The Nigerian Kidnappings: Please Don’t Let This Be a Social Media Fad

By now we know the story: On April 14th of this year, nearly 300 schoolgirls were kidnapped from their school in Chibok, a region of northeastern Nigeria by a group of Islamic militants named Boko Haram. The girls were in the midst of taking their final exams at the school. The group claims that they have sold the girls as slaves or young brides in response to their views against Westernized culture and politics and education of women. The sensationalist headlines and theories make for a social media behemoth, with an evil crime and easy-to-hate criminals. So much so that First Lady Michelle Obama has gotten in to release this tweet, with the now trendy handle #BringBackOurGirls:
I am saddened by the events happened in Nigeria. I am a mother, and I honor education. I applaud the worldwide attention to this deplorable event. But for some reason, this current Twitter crusade somehow cheapens the seriousness of what has happened here. I hope that the girls are found sooner than later, and furthermore, I hope that this issue becomes more than just the latest trending hashtag.

The Nigerian Kidnappings: Please Don’t Let This Be a Social Media Fad

By now we know the story: On April 14th of this year, nearly 300 schoolgirls were kidnapped from their school in Chibok, a region of northeastern Nigeria by a group of Islamic militants named Boko Haram. The girls were in the midst of taking their final exams at the school. The group claims that they have sold the girls as slaves or young brides in response to their views against Westernized culture and politics and education of women. The sensationalist headlines and theories make for a social media behemoth, with an evil crime and easy-to-hate criminals. So much so that First Lady Michelle Obama has gotten in to release this tweet, with the now trendy handle #BringBackOurGirls:
I am saddened by the events happened in Nigeria. I am a mother, and I honor education. I applaud the worldwide attention to this deplorable event. But for some reason, this current Twitter crusade somehow cheapens the seriousness of what has happened here. I hope that the girls are found sooner than later, and furthermore, I hope that this issue becomes more than just the latest trending hashtag.

The 2014 Met Costume Gala: Did Anybody Read the Invite?

This year’s theme was a celebration of Charles James, an American designer credited with bringing traditions of haute couture from Paris and London to the States in the 1940s. He is praised for his acute attention to details with an abundance of extravagant layers, architectural folds and rich fabrics.
And now for the ball.
I think many celebs got it, and most others simply dressed for a typical red carpet event (some of which I loved, but really, there was a theme for the party). The Met Ball has always been a splashy event, but I think the event has become a bit convoluted, with everyone trying to be “best dressed” instead of honoring the event. It’s not the Oscars, or the Grammy’s. Yes, it’s fancy, but more so fanciful.  Here are a few that got the hint.

The bloggers were dragging her, but she is more in theme than most.

These ladies looked stunning, but missed the theme entirely:
 I give Rihanna a slight pass, for the draping and structured shoulders. But the dress is not on theme.


Beyonce should have worn this dress to last year’s Punk-inspired gala.

Lupita: Fabulous costume, wrong ball
If you want to see what everyone else was wearing, head over to Facebook Pinterest for the party.
Follow Lavish’s board 2014 Met Costume Gala on Pinterest.

The 2014 Met Costume Gala: Did Anybody Read the Invite?

This year’s theme was a celebration of Charles James, an American designer credited with bringing traditions of haute couture from Paris and London to the States in the 1940s. He is praised for his acute attention to details with an abundance of extravagant layers, architectural folds and rich fabrics.
And now for the ball.
I think many celebs got it, and most others simply dressed for a typical red carpet event (some of which I loved, but really, there was a theme for the party). The Met Ball has always been a splashy event, but I think the event has become a bit convoluted, with everyone trying to be “best dressed” instead of honoring the event. It’s not the Oscars, or the Grammy’s. Yes, it’s fancy, but more so fanciful.  Here are a few that got the hint.

The bloggers were dragging her, but she is more in theme than most.

These ladies looked stunning, but missed the theme entirely:
 I give Rihanna a slight pass, for the draping and structured shoulders. But the dress is not on theme.


Beyonce should have worn this dress to last year’s Punk-inspired gala.

Lupita: Fabulous costume, wrong ball
If you want to see what everyone else was wearing, head over to Facebook Pinterest for the party.
Follow Lavish’s board 2014 Met Costume Gala on Pinterest.

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