Month: March 2014 (Page 1 of 6)

The REAL Cost of Your Mani-Pedi

I came across an article in the New York Daily News this morning about a group of workers who are suing their boss for unfair wages, unpaid overtime, and poor working conditions. Which got me thinking about my own relationship with nail salons. In my 20’s I’d see the nail salon for a weekly dose of pampering, with extra attention paid to my feet, since I danced barefoot nearly every day as a professional African and Haitian dancer. But as I got older, I got busier, and the trips to the nail salon got a little less frequent. And with all the news of filthy salon tubs and dirty tools, I walked past many a nail shop, staring in with a bit of trepidation*.  I would much rather perform a thorough, non-rushed  pedicure in the comfort of my own home, where I have all my favorite products, clean sterile tools, and all the time I need.
But I still will, on occasion, go to a nail salon, and I’ve learned that it’s not always best to find the $20 special, because it may come at a price to the workers. Here are some things that I look out for to hopefully make sure that the salon is treating it’s employees right:
• Are the employees in a generally good mood?
• Do they engage with their boss, and shoot the breeze sometimes?
• Do the employees and the boss do chores together?
• Does your tech engage with you besides requesting your preferences?
These little things tell a whole lot about the type of employee in the shop, and if they are being treated fairly. Ladies, we all like a deal, but sometimes that $20 special is just not worth it. You never know what kind of organization or poor work practices you may be funding. Use your dollars wisely, and do business with reputable salons that not only offer you a deal, great service, but a solid and honest work environment for your nail technician.
*Thanks, Gregg Leakes

The REAL Cost of Your Mani-Pedi

I came across an article in the New York Daily News this morning about a group of workers who are suing their boss for unfair wages, unpaid overtime, and poor working conditions. Which got me thinking about my own relationship with nail salons. In my 20’s I’d see the nail salon for a weekly dose of pampering, with extra attention paid to my feet, since I danced barefoot nearly every day as a professional African and Haitian dancer. But as I got older, I got busier, and the trips to the nail salon got a little less frequent. And with all the news of filthy salon tubs and dirty tools, I walked past many a nail shop, staring in with a bit of trepidation*.  I would much rather perform a thorough, non-rushed  pedicure in the comfort of my own home, where I have all my favorite products, clean sterile tools, and all the time I need.
But I still will, on occasion, go to a nail salon, and I’ve learned that it’s not always best to find the $20 special, because it may come at a price to the workers. Here are some things that I look out for to hopefully make sure that the salon is treating it’s employees right:
• Are the employees in a generally good mood?
• Do they engage with their boss, and shoot the breeze sometimes?
• Do the employees and the boss do chores together?
• Does your tech engage with you besides requesting your preferences?
These little things tell a whole lot about the type of employee in the shop, and if they are being treated fairly. Ladies, we all like a deal, but sometimes that $20 special is just not worth it. You never know what kind of organization or poor work practices you may be funding. Use your dollars wisely, and do business with reputable salons that not only offer you a deal, great service, but a solid and honest work environment for your nail technician.
*Thanks, Gregg Leakes

Artness: Lorna Thompson

Corridor, 2003
Lorna Thompson is a Brooklyn-based multimedia artist whose collection of works–spanning over 30 years–will be honored in a retrospective at the Baltic Gallery in Gateshead, UK.
Thompson’s works are a collection of photography, video and multimedia objects that focus on the interpretation of gestures, and often have the feeling of an anthropologic study. The stark images invite the viewer to make their own commentary–horrific or benign—on the imagery, while pulling on her own experience, such as in Momentum, in which she explains how, as a child,  she was horrified by a dance performance in which she took part, but found incredibly boring.

Momentum, 2011
Waterbearer, 1986
You’re Fine, 1988
I’ve really been feeling the works of the women masters as of late. They have been providing compelling pieces that open up dialogue about sex and race, and they all have several solid decades behind them that create a full picture of the evolution of their visions.
View more of Lorna Simpson’s work here.

Artness: Lorna Thompson

Corridor, 2003


Lorna Thompson is a Brooklyn-based multimedia artist whose collection of works–spanning over 30 years–will be honored in a retrospective at the Baltic Gallery in Gateshead, UK.

Thompson’s works are a collection of photography, video and multimedia objects that focus on the interpretation of gestures, and often have the feeling of an anthropologic study. The stark images invite the viewer to make their own commentary–horrific or benign—on the imagery, while pulling on her own experience, such as in Momentum, in which she explains how, as a child,  she was horrified by a dance performance in which she took part, but found incredibly boring.

Momentum, 2011
Waterbearer, 1986
You’re Fine, 1988
I’ve really been feeling the works of the women masters as of late. They have been providing compelling pieces that open up dialogue about sex and race, and they all have several solid decades behind them that create a full picture of the evolution of their visions.
View more of Lorna Simpson’s work here.

The Hotness: Gianvito Rossi Leopard-Print Calf Hair Sandals

An wishful indulgence for spring, and a perfect standby for summer in the city.
Sandal, $900, Net-A-Porter

The Hotness: Gianvito Rossi Leopard-Print Calf Hair Sandals

An wishful indulgence for spring, and a perfect standby for summer in the city.
Sandal, $900, Net-A-Porter

ManCrush: Pharrell Williams for GQ

Very few men have the personality or chutzpah to pull off bold colors, unique suits and graphic accessories with ease. But Pharrell does it fantastically in his new spread for GQ magazine. I had to post these on this fabulous Friday, because they make me so Happy.

ManCrush: Pharrell Williams for GQ

Very few men have the personality or chutzpah to pull off bold colors, unique suits and graphic accessories with ease. But Pharrell does it fantastically in his new spread for GQ magazine. I had to post these on this fabulous Friday, because they make me so Happy.

Lavish Trends: Kitty Power

I love this campy Kenzo tiger sweater Beyonce posted the other day. It’s lighthearted, fun, and dressed up just right with a midid skirt and nude pumps to make it ‘adult’. Because I hate dressing like a kid. I just might get one and dress it up for a date night. 
Any of the selections from the Nylon shop will do. Like this $80 one:
Or This is a cute $28 option

Lavish Trends: Kitty Power

I love this campy Kenzo tiger sweater Beyonce posted the other day. It’s lighthearted, fun, and dressed up just right with a midid skirt and nude pumps to make it ‘adult’. Because I hate dressing like a kid. I just might get one and dress it up for a date night. 
Any of the selections from the Nylon shop will do. Like this $80 one:
Or This is a cute $28 option

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