Month: May 2011 (Page 1 of 8)

Lavish Trends: Denim Bags

I have a soft spot for a good old fashioned denim shopper tote. My favorite Addidas denim bag has endless hidden pockets, and its gently worn corners look charming with my flirtiest summer dresses. While Rihanna’s $995 Prada version is certainly the bomb, here are a few less expensive options:

Lucky Brand, $79

APC, $190

See by Chloe, $76

Lavish Trends: Denim Bags

I have a soft spot for a good old fashioned denim shopper tote. My favorite Addidas denim bag has endless hidden pockets, and its gently worn corners look charming with my flirtiest summer dresses. While Rihanna’s $995 Prada version is certainly the bomb, here are a few less expensive options:

Lucky Brand, $79

APC, $190

See by Chloe, $76

The Colors of Carol: Cassie+ Solange+ Selita

I have a bone to pick with Carol’s Daughter, and its a bone that has likely already been picked to the marrow. A few months ago DJ Solange Knowles, and models Cassie and Selita Ebanks were picked as the new spokes-models for the beauty company’s diversity initiative. They are seen here at the latest promotion for the Monoi Repairing Collection launch at Sephora in New York City.

Countless women howled at the lack of diversity among the women, and I was among them;
it is clear that all of three women are more or less the same color. Could they not have found a darker skinned beauty? I tweeted about a new documentary called Dark Girls, that I think every conscious woman should see. Its clear that the color madness has affected even the marketing of a previously all-natural, all-embracing beauty company for woman of color. I used to cherish visiting the original Carol’s daughter store on Dekalb Avenue in Brooklyn, with it’s old school mason jars, and brown paper bags. Finally, there was a store with products made for me, with sisters who looked like me. It’s a shame how much they’ve changed.

Is there only one color for women of color?

The Colors of Carol: Cassie+ Solange+ Selita

I have a bone to pick with Carol’s Daughter, and its a bone that has likely already been picked to the marrow. A few months ago DJ Solange Knowles, and models Cassie and Selita Ebanks were picked as the new spokes-models for the beauty company’s diversity initiative. They are seen here at the latest promotion for the Monoi Repairing Collection launch at Sephora in New York City.

Countless women howled at the lack of diversity among the women, and I was among them;
it is clear that all of three women are more or less the same color. Could they not have found a darker skinned beauty? I tweeted about a new documentary called Dark Girls, that I think every conscious woman should see. Its clear that the color madness has affected even the marketing of a previously all-natural, all-embracing beauty company for woman of color. I used to cherish visiting the original Carol’s daughter store on Dekalb Avenue in Brooklyn, with it’s old school mason jars, and brown paper bags. Finally, there was a store with products made for me, with sisters who looked like me. It’s a shame how much they’ve changed.

Is there only one color for women of color?

Lavish Jewelry: Beso Beso

I am in love with Beso Beso’s collection of earthy, texture-rich jewelry designs. Each piece is like a rare treasure you would find on an exotic excursion. The gently-priced line  can effortlessly work on a lazy stroll along the Mediterranean,
an early morning trip to the Farmer’s Market, or a late lunch on a Thursday afternoon. I’ve already seen several pieces that I would love to work into my wardrobe.

Beso Beso, the handcrafted jewelry line founded by California native Jacqueline Brown, has recently launched its free spirited and one-of-a-kind designs to the market. The inspiring and versatile pieces include earrings, bracelets, and necklaces. All Beso Beso jewelry is handmade in Italian gold or fine sterling silver, embellished with semi-precious stones and diamonds.


Shop Beso Beso Jewelry

Lavish Jewelry: Beso Beso

I am in love with Beso Beso’s collection of earthy, texture-rich jewelry designs. Each piece is like a rare treasure you would find on an exotic excursion. The gently-priced line  can effortlessly work on a lazy stroll along the Mediterranean,
an early morning trip to the Farmer’s Market, or a late lunch on a Thursday afternoon. I’ve already seen several pieces that I would love to work into my wardrobe.

Beso Beso, the handcrafted jewelry line founded by California native Jacqueline Brown, has recently launched its free spirited and one-of-a-kind designs to the market. The inspiring and versatile pieces include earrings, bracelets, and necklaces. All Beso Beso jewelry is handmade in Italian gold or fine sterling silver, embellished with semi-precious stones and diamonds.


Shop Beso Beso Jewelry

Lavish Home: Anthroplogie Ankara Furniture

As I’ve said before, I love anything with African fabrics. These  arm chairs and ottomans from Anthropologie feature the African Dutch wax prints of which you are likely familiar. But at $1700 a pop ($200 for the ottomans) would it be cheaper to just hire someone to upholster a vintage chair? More looks after the jump

Lavish Home: Anthroplogie Ankara Furniture

As I’ve said before, I love anything with African fabrics. These  arm chairs and ottomans from Anthropologie feature the African Dutch wax prints of which you are likely familiar. But at $1700 a pop ($200 for the ottomans) would it be cheaper to just hire someone to upholster a vintage chair? More looks after the jump

Oprah Winfrey: The O Factor

 While everyone was hyperventilating over the bombastic finale shows for the regal send-off of Oprah Winfrey, I reflected on the effect that she has had on me, in my lifetime. I am extremely proud of this extraordinary Black woman who came from such humble and unfortunate beginnings; in many ways we share the same life story.
Consequently, I also have come to think of Oprah as the modern-day mammy–a shoulder on which disparate White women have come to cry. This is not an altogether awful thing as many Black historians would make you believe. In a way she became an Everywoman, an entity in which all women  (and men) of all colors felt  comfortable. This is a phenomenal trait and not one that I have seen anyone else accomplish so flawlessly. With this trait she was able to reach the unreachable, expand perceptions, and bring notable causes, people, and world issues from obscurity to a world stage. While questionable at times–most notably her experimentation with more New Age concepts towards the end of her show–I applaud her success as a Black woman, business leader and entrepreneur. My only regret in witnessing the end of her network TV era was that I did not have my own chance to sit on her golden couch.

Oprah Winfrey: The O Factor

 While everyone was hyperventilating over the bombastic finale shows for the regal send-off of Oprah Winfrey, I reflected on the effect that she has had on me, in my lifetime. I am extremely proud of this extraordinary Black woman who came from such humble and unfortunate beginnings; in many ways we share the same life story.
Consequently, I also have come to think of Oprah as the modern-day mammy–a shoulder on which disparate White women have come to cry. This is not an altogether awful thing as many Black historians would make you believe. In a way she became an Everywoman, an entity in which all women  (and men) of all colors felt  comfortable. This is a phenomenal trait and not one that I have seen anyone else accomplish so flawlessly. With this trait she was able to reach the unreachable, expand perceptions, and bring notable causes, people, and world issues from obscurity to a world stage. While questionable at times–most notably her experimentation with more New Age concepts towards the end of her show–I applaud her success as a Black woman, business leader and entrepreneur. My only regret in witnessing the end of her network TV era was that I did not have my own chance to sit on her golden couch.

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